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Vocational Skills and Education

Vocational Education

Vocational & Career Information

  • "Every calling is great when greatly pursued." - Oliver Wendell Holmes
  • Work Permit

    • For forms, see below. Any student under the age of 18 needs to have a valid Work Permit in order to work at any time, during the school year and/or vacations & holidays. CORE, in addition, upholds the policy that students must have a minimum grade point average of 2.0 in order to be issued a work permit. At any time a school and/or school district retains the right to refuse or take away a permit to work if it deems it necessary for the well being of the student.
    • Work Permit Guidelines | When school is in Session:
      • 16-17 year old students may work a maximum of 48 hours per week, not to exceed 4 hours per day Monday through Thursday and not to exceed 8 hours on Friday, Saturday, or Sunday. The spread of hours that a 16-17 year old student can work is 5 a.m. to 10 p.m.
      • 14-15 year old students, who have completed the 7th grade, may work a maximum of 18 hours per week, not to exceed 3 hours per day Monday through Friday and not to exceed 8 hours on Saturday or Sunday. The spread of hours that a 14-15 year old student can work is 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
      • 12-13 year old students may be employed only during school holidays and vacations!
    • Work Permit Guidelines | When school is not in Session:
      • 16-17 year old students may work a maximum of 48 hours per week, not to exceed 8 hours per day
      • 14-15 year old students may work a maximum of 40 hours per week, not to exceed 8 hours per day
      • 12-13 year old students may work a maximum of 40 hours per week, not to exceed 8 hours per day
      • 16-17 year old students may work a maximum of 48 hours per week, not to exceed 4 hours per day Monday through Thursday and not to exceed 8 hours on Friday, Saturday, or Sunday. The spread of hours that a 16-17 year old student can work is 5 a.m. to 10 p.m.
      • 14-15 year old students, who have completed the 7th grade, may work a maximum of 18 hours per week, not to exceed 3 hours per day Monday through Friday and not to exceed 8 hours on Saturday or Sunday. The spread of hours that a 14-15 year old student can work is 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
      • 12-13 year old students may be employed only during school holidays and vacations!
    • The work permit expires automatically when you leave, quit or are fired from a job. You must request a new work permit each time you obtain a new job, at the beginning of each school year, and if you change your school of attendance.
    • On the day of a student's 18th Birthday a Work Permit is no longer required!
    • For more information regarding rules and regulations regarding working minors, see California Child Labor Law Pamphlet.
    • Work Permit Procedure

      1. Download the PDF forms "Statement of Intent to Employ Minor and Request for Work Permit" and "Laws and Agencies Controlling Employment of Minors"
      2. Or acquire this form from the front desk, back of the high school catalog, or from your High School Counselor.
      3. Complete the section entitled "For Minor To Complete"
      4. Allow employer to complete the section entitled "For Employer To Complete"
      5. Allow parent to complete the section entitled "For Parent To Complete"
      6. Turn in to front desk or fax this completed form to the school office along with a copy of your social security card. Fax to (530) 742-6067 or send to:

        C.O.R.E. Charter School
        321 16th Street
        Marysville, CA  95901
        Attn: School Counselor/Work Permits

        The school office will authorize the work permit and return it to the student to sign and give to her/his employer.
    • Work Experience Education (WEE)

      • Work Experience Education is a great way for high school students to earn units through coursework and a paying job. While being employed at a job of either the student's choice or teacher/counselor's assistance, the student is required to complete accompanying coursework that assists the student in personal career assessment, job market knowledge, and job search tools such as the job search, resumes, and interview techniques. Students can earn a maximum of 10 units of Work Experience per semester (depending on coursework and the number of hours worked) and a maximum of 40 units throughout their high school career. In order to be admitted into the program, students need to be a minimum of 16 years of age or in 11th grade. To become enrolled students need to:
        • Read the Course Description (MS Word)
        • Speak with their Independent Study Teacher about enrolling in WEE
        • Download, fill out, and return a WEE enrollment form (MS Word) to Serene Turner, your High School Counselor
        • Begin thinking about what type of job fits the students goals
      • Career Information Websites

        • Below are various sites for youth (and adults) to look into future options as well as current employment options.

          California Employment Development Department - Youth
          This is part of California's government site and includes youth programs, career information sites, assessment, jobs of the future.
        • Job Hunter's Bible
          This site is sponsored by Richard Bolles, who authored What Color Is Your Parachute?, and has long been considered a "guru" of job hunters around the world. This is a great guide to help you through the job quest and includes sections for the "Working Wounded," re-thinking our vocational purpose post-September 11th, the accepted mark of a good employee, and more!
        • North Central Counties Consortium
          The NCCC was formed to administer federally funded job training programs in Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Yuba, and Sutter counties. Their services include One Stop Career Centers, job search workshops, youth training programs, and employment preparation training.
        • Job Corps
          This is a U.S. Department of Labor site directing business, adults, youth, dislocated workers, and workforce professionals to training and employment services.
        • Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2010 - 2011
          The Occupational Outlook Handbook is a nationally recognized source of career information, designed to provide valuable assistance to individuals making decisions about their future work lives.
        • My Future
          This is a great site for teens thinking about life after high school. Included is a Work Interest quiz, comparison of different careers, internships, apprenticeships, etc. The site is geared toward the military as an attractive option.
        • So You Are Thinking Of Dropping Out Of School
          This page has alarming statistics and earning potentials by education level geared towards high school students thinking about dropping out.
      • Regional Occupation Program (ROP)

        • What Is ROP?
          ROP (Regional Occupational Program) is classroom and on-the-job training in a number of different occupations and futures. Typically, ROP programs are housed in the local high school, but this does not mean that it is only available to only those high school students. ROP is an independent, typically WASC-accredited program that contracts with schools to offer this opportunity to high school students. Our students can and should take advantage of this opportunity. (See the Tri-County Regional Occupational Program for more information.) Different opportunities available include:
          • Hospital Health Occupations
          • Auto Body Paint/Repair
          • Banking/Financial Services
          • Animal and Veterinary Services
          • Emergency Medical Careers
          • Web Page Design
          • Sports Medicine Careers
          • etc. - The list is different depending on your area 
        • How Does It Work?
          If a student and/or Independent Study Teacher recognize a specific program that fits well with the student's interests and future aspirations, there are a number of ways of going about signing up for the course, depending on the student's geographic region.
          • Some programs require students to first contact the course instructor to determine availability and appropriateness of the course.
          • Some programs require that the student contact the specific ROP office to enroll.
        • Can I Earn Credit?
          Students earn credit towards high school and, in some cases, community college credit. Credits are assigned by CORE, but with the recommendation of the ROP program. For instance, most programs in the Yuba City ROP earn 5 units per semester. Certain courses will have articulation with a specific high school's graduation requirement. The responsibility of describing the articulation agreement is the student's.
        • What Are The Benefits?
          It is rare to have the facilities and wherewithal to train students in equipment-intensive, specialized, and/or professional career opportunities. The state of California has recognized the need for this training and has created programs that link "in-the-field" industry with student. Students earn high school credit, gain hands-on experience.
        • What Does It Cost?
          There is no cost to take an ROP course, except in some cases where students need to purchase equipment. Emergency Medical Careers students, for instance, need to purchase steel-toed boots, a tuberculosis test, malpractice insurance, and pay a CPR fee.
        • When Does My Student Sign Up?
          Some ROP's enroll in the spring for the upcoming fall semester, though most will accept students right on into the semester. There is, however, a cut-off point that is usually early in a semester.
        • Tri-Counties ROP does a "pre-enrollment" in the spring, but accepts students at the beginning of the semester (August/September for the fall semester). Basically, if your student knows that they would like to take a course in the fall, they should do the legwork in the summer.
      • GED/CHSPE

        • Students wishing to have an equivalent to a high school diploma have two options available to them: the General Education Development exam and the California High School Proficiency exam.
        • Our Charter School is a California public school and a state-certified diploma will be issued upon completion of graduation requirements. College preparatory and general courses are available.
        • The GED offers a diploma alternative for students.
          There are, of course, pros and cons
        • The eligibility requirements are as follows:
          • The individual is 18 years of age or older, or within 60 days of his or her 18th birthday (regardless of school enrollment status).
          • The individual must be within 60 days of when he or she would have graduated from high school had he or she remained in school and followed the usual course of study (please note that examinees testing under this criteria may not be enrolled in school).
          • The individual is 17 years of age, has been out of school for at least 60 consecutive school days, and provides a letter of request for the test from the military, a post-secondary educational institution or a prospective employer.
          • The individual is 17 years of age and is incarcerated in a California state or county correctional facility; persons testing under these conditions must meet all of the following criteria:
          • The examinee does not have a realistic chance of completing the requirements for a high school diploma.
          • The examinee has adequate academic skills to successfully complete the GED test battery.
          • The examinee understands the options available regarding acquisition of a high school diploma, the high school equivalency certificate or the high school proficiency certificate, and the requirements, expectations, benefits and limitations of each option.
          • The examinee has sufficient commitment time left to complete the entire GED test battery; however, if released before the test is completed, the examinee may complete testing at an authorized testing center.
        • Persons who pass the GED test at age 17 will not receive the equivalency certificate until their 18th birthday; a letter of intent is issued which states that the certificate is being held pending the examinee's 18th birthday.
        • For more information, on the GED, please visit their official website.
        • CHSPE
        • The California High School Proficiency Examination is the equivalent to a high school diploma. The exam is open to anyone 16 or older, whether enrolled in school or not. Those under 16 may take the CHSPE if they have completed the tenth grade or are enrolled in the second semester of tenth grade. Some students who pass the CHSPE continue to attend high school. Anyone under 18 who passes the exam must have parental permission in order to leave school before regular graduation. For more information, visit the California High School Proficiency Examination site (CHSPE.net) or call (916) 657-5216.

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